Asia@RMITThe Graduate School of Business and Law together with the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies invites you to attend the next Asia @ RMIT seminar.

Date: Wednesday 11 September 2013
Time: 12:15 pm – 1:30 pm
Venue: Building 80, Level 5, Room 01

RSVP: aastha.swaroop@rmit.edu.au by Monday 9 September, 12 pm (for catering). A light lunch will be provided

A short history of digital activism in post-Suharto Indonesia by Dr John Postill
Vice-Chancellor’s Senior Research Fellow at RMIT University, Melbourne (2013-2016), and Digital Anthropology Fellow at University College London (UCL)

In this presentation I tell the story of Indonesia’s digital activism scene since the end of Suharto’s New Order in 1998 and subsequent democratic transition. I survey the main uses of digital media for activism, asking whether the country’s ubiquitous social media and smartphones have made any significant difference to the everyday practices and collective actions of activists, including their relations with other political actors such as journalists, politicians, religious leaders and celebrities. I also ask what part, if any, earlier digital technologies (email, listservs, web forums, blogs) still play in contemporary Indonesian activism, ending with suggestions for future research.

AND

GUSS and the Asian Century: where to from here? by Professor David Hayward
Dean, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies (GUSS)

The Federal Government’s White Paper, Australian and the Asian Century, has sparked considerable interest and excitement across the public sector about how we can engage more fully with what is a massive redistribution of world economic, political and social power toward Asia and away from Europe and North America. While the White Paper has been criticised for a variety of reasons, it nevertheless has been rightly praised for highlighting the scale of the transformation underway. In this presentation, I will provide a summary of the White Paper and its weaknesses, but will spend most of the time focusing on the implications for GUSS and how we might respond in a constructive way to the opportunities that await us as a key part of a Global University of Technology and Design.

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